Jump to content
RemedySpot.com
Sign in to follow this  
Guest guest

question

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Guest guest

Here is my slant on the deal. Your there to treat. If you are in danger,

retreat. Notify law enforcement. If someone really wants to get at you, you

really will not have enough warning to spray. Otherwise you have enough warning

to retreat. If the issue of being attacked or hurt continues to bother you, you

might want to look for

other work. There is always the possibility that this may occur. You can't dwell

on it. If folks start arming themselves with the spray, what will they want to

carry next? The best defense you can have is always stay alert, pay attention to

your surroundings and read the scene. I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin

years and

it has worked for me.

Henry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

Here is my slant on the deal. Your there to treat. If you are in danger,

retreat. Notify law enforcement. If someone really wants to get at you, you

really will not have enough warning to spray. Otherwise you have enough warning

to retreat. If the issue of being attacked or hurt continues to bother you, you

might want to look for

other work. There is always the possibility that this may occur. You can't dwell

on it. If folks start arming themselves with the spray, what will they want to

carry next? The best defense you can have is always stay alert, pay attention to

your surroundings and read the scene. I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin

years and

it has worked for me.

Henry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

>>From: Henry

>>I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin years and

>>it has worked for me.

Wow, you must be as old as...well.....Koonce....:)

Mike

" Tater Salad " Hatfield EMT-P

EMStock 2005!! Coming soon!!!

www.emstock.com

www.temsf.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

>>From: Henry

>>I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin years and

>>it has worked for me.

Wow, you must be as old as...well.....Koonce....:)

Mike

" Tater Salad " Hatfield EMT-P

EMStock 2005!! Coming soon!!!

www.emstock.com

www.temsf.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

>>From: Henry

>>I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin years and

>>it has worked for me.

Wow, you must be as old as...well.....Koonce....:)

Mike

" Tater Salad " Hatfield EMT-P

EMStock 2005!! Coming soon!!!

www.emstock.com

www.temsf.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

I agree with you there. I do remember something back in 97 or so about

EMS carrying side arms. Needless to say (but I'm gonna say it anyway) I

got a cold feeling in my gut at the thought of it. I could almost hear

the news story about a medic taking a round from his own gun after a

combative patient got a hold of it. All kidding aside, I think carrying

pepper spray is just one more thing that could bite us in the backside.

If I am in a situation where I'm in danger I leave. If I am prevented

from leaving I try to talk, and if that wont work an O2 cylinder can

work wonders as an offensive device in a pinch. (D's are better for that

IMHO). Bottom line is that situational awareness is the key, along with

listening to that little voice in your head that warns you something bad

might be coming your way. I've only been doing this kind of stuff for a

few years, but I have worked security and was in the military before

that and that same lesson was taught in each case. Since I have been

doing first response stuff, I have never had to cause harm to a patient,

but I have had to restrain a couple (with help thank the Big Boss Man)

for their own safety and hat of other responders. Call me lazy, but I

prefer not to create more work for myself. I leave my guns at home and

the pepper spray on the store shelf.

Crosby

EMT-B and luvin it.

Henry wrote:

>Here is my slant on the deal. Your there to treat. If you are in danger,

retreat. Notify law enforcement. If someone really wants to get at you, you

really will not have enough warning to spray. Otherwise you have enough warning

to retreat. If the issue of being attacked or hurt continues to bother you, you

might want to look for

>other work. There is always the possibility that this may occur. You can't

dwell on it. If folks start arming themselves with the spray, what will they

want to carry next? The best defense you can have is always stay alert, pay

attention to your surroundings and read the scene. I have been doing this for

over 30 sumpin years and

>it has worked for me.

>

>Henry

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

I agree with you there. I do remember something back in 97 or so about

EMS carrying side arms. Needless to say (but I'm gonna say it anyway) I

got a cold feeling in my gut at the thought of it. I could almost hear

the news story about a medic taking a round from his own gun after a

combative patient got a hold of it. All kidding aside, I think carrying

pepper spray is just one more thing that could bite us in the backside.

If I am in a situation where I'm in danger I leave. If I am prevented

from leaving I try to talk, and if that wont work an O2 cylinder can

work wonders as an offensive device in a pinch. (D's are better for that

IMHO). Bottom line is that situational awareness is the key, along with

listening to that little voice in your head that warns you something bad

might be coming your way. I've only been doing this kind of stuff for a

few years, but I have worked security and was in the military before

that and that same lesson was taught in each case. Since I have been

doing first response stuff, I have never had to cause harm to a patient,

but I have had to restrain a couple (with help thank the Big Boss Man)

for their own safety and hat of other responders. Call me lazy, but I

prefer not to create more work for myself. I leave my guns at home and

the pepper spray on the store shelf.

Crosby

EMT-B and luvin it.

Henry wrote:

>Here is my slant on the deal. Your there to treat. If you are in danger,

retreat. Notify law enforcement. If someone really wants to get at you, you

really will not have enough warning to spray. Otherwise you have enough warning

to retreat. If the issue of being attacked or hurt continues to bother you, you

might want to look for

>other work. There is always the possibility that this may occur. You can't

dwell on it. If folks start arming themselves with the spray, what will they

want to carry next? The best defense you can have is always stay alert, pay

attention to your surroundings and read the scene. I have been doing this for

over 30 sumpin years and

>it has worked for me.

>

>Henry

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

I agree with you there. I do remember something back in 97 or so about

EMS carrying side arms. Needless to say (but I'm gonna say it anyway) I

got a cold feeling in my gut at the thought of it. I could almost hear

the news story about a medic taking a round from his own gun after a

combative patient got a hold of it. All kidding aside, I think carrying

pepper spray is just one more thing that could bite us in the backside.

If I am in a situation where I'm in danger I leave. If I am prevented

from leaving I try to talk, and if that wont work an O2 cylinder can

work wonders as an offensive device in a pinch. (D's are better for that

IMHO). Bottom line is that situational awareness is the key, along with

listening to that little voice in your head that warns you something bad

might be coming your way. I've only been doing this kind of stuff for a

few years, but I have worked security and was in the military before

that and that same lesson was taught in each case. Since I have been

doing first response stuff, I have never had to cause harm to a patient,

but I have had to restrain a couple (with help thank the Big Boss Man)

for their own safety and hat of other responders. Call me lazy, but I

prefer not to create more work for myself. I leave my guns at home and

the pepper spray on the store shelf.

Crosby

EMT-B and luvin it.

Henry wrote:

>Here is my slant on the deal. Your there to treat. If you are in danger,

retreat. Notify law enforcement. If someone really wants to get at you, you

really will not have enough warning to spray. Otherwise you have enough warning

to retreat. If the issue of being attacked or hurt continues to bother you, you

might want to look for

>other work. There is always the possibility that this may occur. You can't

dwell on it. If folks start arming themselves with the spray, what will they

want to carry next? The best defense you can have is always stay alert, pay

attention to your surroundings and read the scene. I have been doing this for

over 30 sumpin years and

>it has worked for me.

>

>Henry

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

at the risk of getting ripped here, I taught Koonce everything he doesn't

know.

Henry

Hatfield wrote:

> >>From: Henry

>

> >>I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin years and

> >>it has worked for me.

>

> Wow, you must be as old as...well.....Koonce....:)

>

> Mike

>

> " Tater Salad " Hatfield EMT-P

>

> EMStock 2005!! Coming soon!!!

>

> www.emstock.com

> www.temsf.org

>

>

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

at the risk of getting ripped here, I taught Koonce everything he doesn't

know.

Henry

Hatfield wrote:

> >>From: Henry

>

> >>I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin years and

> >>it has worked for me.

>

> Wow, you must be as old as...well.....Koonce....:)

>

> Mike

>

> " Tater Salad " Hatfield EMT-P

>

> EMStock 2005!! Coming soon!!!

>

> www.emstock.com

> www.temsf.org

>

>

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

at the risk of getting ripped here, I taught Koonce everything he doesn't

know.

Henry

Hatfield wrote:

> >>From: Henry

>

> >>I have been doing this for over 30 sumpin years and

> >>it has worked for me.

>

> Wow, you must be as old as...well.....Koonce....:)

>

> Mike

>

> " Tater Salad " Hatfield EMT-P

>

> EMStock 2005!! Coming soon!!!

>

> www.emstock.com

> www.temsf.org

>

>

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

is there anyone who is unable to eat:

gluten, grains, FODMAP's (which include:

* Oligosaccharides: fructans (in wheat, onions), galactans,

raffinose (in asparagus, beans, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts,

and whole grains);

* Disaccharides: lactose (dairy products);

* Mono-saccharides: fructose (honey, apples)

* Polyols: sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, isomalt, maltitol,

arabitol, erythritol, glycol, glycerol, lactitol, ribitol (they are

used as artificial sweeteners, stabilizers etc).

curious, if you are out there, how you manage.

all best

spencer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

At 08:55 PM 10/26/2008, you wrote:

is there anyone who is unable to

eat:

gluten, grains, FODMAP's (which include:

* Oligosaccharides: fructans (in wheat, onions), galactans,

raffinose (in asparagus, beans, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts,

and whole grains);

* Disaccharides: lactose (dairy products);

* Mono-saccharides: fructose (honey, apples)

* Polyols: sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, isomalt, maltitol,

arabitol, erythritol, glycol, glycerol, lactitol, ribitol (they are

used as artificial sweeteners, stabilizers etc).

curious, if you are out there, how you manage.

all best

spencer

Spencer,

Have you read Breaking the Vicious Cycle?

Gluten and grains are forbidden on SCD.

So are disaccharides and polyols, which include all the sugar

alcohols.

Fructose is only permitted in honey and fruit, not as a separate

sweetener. Many people find, particularly at the beginning of the

diet, that they must limit fruit and honey.

Lactose is not permitted on SCD, and only 24 hour, properly prepared

yogurt, which has no lactose, and other dairy products, such as dry curd

cottage cheese and aged cheeses (also largely lactose free) are

permitted.

Beans, cabbage, broccoli, and brussels sprouts can all be problematic and

are somewhat advanced vegetables.

Wheat and other whole grains are all SCD illegal.

In point of fact, I do very well without most of what you

listed.

Marilyn

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Undiagnosed IBS since 1976, SCD since 2001

Darn Good SCD Cook

No Human Children

Shadow & Sunny Longhair Dachshund

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

yes yes i have read it, of coursei can barely tolerate the yogurt, same with honeyi think the fact that i thought i could have SOMEthing sweet (via the honey) allowed me to stick with the diet as long as i did at firstnow that appears to be off the table but it seems like i am working my way back to SCD but with zero sugarargghhthanks for your response i think i just hadn't put 2 and 2 togetherspencerAt 08:55 PM 10/26/2008, you wrote:is there anyone who is unable to eat:gluten, grains, FODMAP's (which include:* Oligosaccharides: fructans (in wheat, onions), galactans, raffinose (in asparagus, beans, cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and whole grains);* Disaccharides: lactose (dairy products);* Mono-saccharides: fructose (honey, apples)* Polyols: sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, isomalt, maltitol, arabitol, erythritol, glycol, glycerol, lactitol, ribitol (they are used as artificial sweeteners, stabilizers etc).curious, if you are out there, how you manage.all bestspencerSpencer,Have you read Breaking the Vicious Cycle?Gluten and grains are forbidden on SCD.So are disaccharides and polyols, which include all the sugar alcohols.Fructose is only permitted in honey and fruit, not as a separate sweetener. Many people find, particularly at the beginning of the diet, that they must limit fruit and honey.Lactose is not permitted on SCD, and only 24 hour, properly prepared yogurt, which has no lactose, and other dairy products, such as dry curd cottage cheese and aged cheeses (also largely lactose free) are permitted.Beans, cabbage, broccoli, and brussels sprouts can all be problematic and are somewhat advanced vegetables. Wheat and other whole grains are all SCD illegal.In point of fact, I do very well without most of what you listed.— Marilyn New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Undiagnosed IBS since 1976, SCD since 2001 Darn Good SCD Cook No Human Children Shadow & Sunny Longhair Dachshund

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

Spencer,

Try dripping or draining the yogurt into yogurt cheese -- often the

galactose, which is part of the water of hydrolysis (what many people

incorrectly call the " whey " ) can be difficult for the liver to

process. I certainly did better with dripped yogurt, but then, I came to

SCD so jaundiced from a bout with gall bladder disease that they thought

I had liver cancer.

Very ripe bananas are quite sweet.

Zero SUGAR is the key to SCD. Among others.

Marilyn

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Undiagnosed IBS since 1976, SCD since 2001

Darn Good SCD Cook

No Human Children

Shadow & Sunny Longhair Dachshund

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

I don't know anyone who had it done arthroscopically, but my friend

had shoulder surgery. She had some pain the first few days and seemed

to recover fairly fast. Whatever you decide to do, good luck.

Jolie

> I saw the orthopedist on Monday afternoon. Last month I had an MRI on my

> left shoulder. My shoulder has been locked up since January or February.

> The doctor said that there's a bone spur causing an impingement. The bursa

> is inflammed. There is also a small tear in the rotator cuff.

>

> The options he gave me: Physical therapy, surgery, cortisone. We

> eliminated the cortisone right away, since I have had a negative reaction to

> cortisone in the past. Two years ago I was in physical therapy for my

> shoulder. It still took a year for me to gain back enough range of motion

> so that I could use my left arm reasonably well. The doctor wants me to

> think about this.

>

> I'm just wondering if you have had arthroscopic surgery on your shoulder, or

> know somebody who did. How well did the recovery process go?

>

> Donna in WA

>

>

>

>

> ------------------------------------

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

I don't know anyone who had it done arthroscopically, but my friend

had shoulder surgery. She had some pain the first few days and seemed

to recover fairly fast. Whatever you decide to do, good luck.

Jolie

> I saw the orthopedist on Monday afternoon. Last month I had an MRI on my

> left shoulder. My shoulder has been locked up since January or February.

> The doctor said that there's a bone spur causing an impingement. The bursa

> is inflammed. There is also a small tear in the rotator cuff.

>

> The options he gave me: Physical therapy, surgery, cortisone. We

> eliminated the cortisone right away, since I have had a negative reaction to

> cortisone in the past. Two years ago I was in physical therapy for my

> shoulder. It still took a year for me to gain back enough range of motion

> so that I could use my left arm reasonably well. The doctor wants me to

> think about this.

>

> I'm just wondering if you have had arthroscopic surgery on your shoulder, or

> know somebody who did. How well did the recovery process go?

>

> Donna in WA

>

>

>

>

> ------------------------------------

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest

I don't know anyone who had it done arthroscopically, but my friend

had shoulder surgery. She had some pain the first few days and seemed

to recover fairly fast. Whatever you decide to do, good luck.

Jolie

> I saw the orthopedist on Monday afternoon. Last month I had an MRI on my

> left shoulder. My shoulder has been locked up since January or February.

> The doctor said that there's a bone spur causing an impingement. The bursa

> is inflammed. There is also a small tear in the rotator cuff.

>

> The options he gave me: Physical therapy, surgery, cortisone. We

> eliminated the cortisone right away, since I have had a negative reaction to

> cortisone in the past. Two years ago I was in physical therapy for my

> shoulder. It still took a year for me to gain back enough range of motion

> so that I could use my left arm reasonably well. The doctor wants me to

> think about this.

>

> I'm just wondering if you have had arthroscopic surgery on your shoulder, or

> know somebody who did. How well did the recovery process go?

>

> Donna in WA

>

>

>

>

> ------------------------------------

>

>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...